Tuesday, November 24, 2009

Owl Flap

Wow!!  An owl has taken up residence in the Japenese Elm tree beside the house! 

I haven't actually seen it yet.   But for the second morning in a row, walking Miss Daisy, my usual pre-dawn grumbling was interrupted by the sudden, thunderous but silent flapping of giant wings while something owlish flew over my head. 

I can't defend why I thought it was owlish any more than I can explain the oxymoronic silently thunderous sound.   It might have been a hawk or an ibis.  There are plenty of those around the pond.  But it was night!  Or pre-dawn at least.  Owls are nocturnal.

Okay, so it might have been avery small dragon or a very large bat.  Wearing a bowtie with a German accent.  Or did Dracula have a Hungarian accent?   Speaking of hungry, it could well have been one of the last of the escaping turkeys trying to stay hidden for three more days.

Are any of you good at identifying birds by their wing flapping?   This one went "Flash, flutter...pause...flap flap flap."   Any ideas?  The best I can do is rule out hummingbirds because they go "z.z.z.z..z".   Turkey vultures never flap at all but just hover like gliders.  In fact, I can't prove it but I think they are fixed wing birds that are towed up into the sky every morning by owls. 

But I'm convinced this is an owl.  A large one.  Bagman says it is a great horny owl.

It probably sits in the Japanese elm waiting to have sex with Miss Daisy who is a cross between a terrier and an oppossum.   
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And, to be perfectly honest, I have no idea whether the tree is a Japanese elm either.  But I don't think it is an elm, an oak, or a magnolia which are the only trees this poor excuse for a naturalist knows. 

9 comments:

  1. Fun! Let me tell you that turkey vultures make the biggest racket when they take off from their roost. Turkey vultures migrate to & winter in this part of Texas and roost in the piney woods in our neighborhood which is near the Colorado River. When I take Miss Gertie for a walk late in the afternoon we sometimes "spook" them and the sound of their wings is like sheets flapping in the wind. I'll bet your creature is an owl!

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  2. Get out early again tomorrow and be very quiet and maybe you can spot it before it flies away. Turn all the lights out and maybe you can see her owl eyes. You are a hoot yourself maybe SHE is waiting for you.
    QMM

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  3. I love Queenmothermamaw's comment! You old hoot. I am very jealous. I SAW once a horned owl in our back yard, actually the neighbors, and was so excited! I know he lives deep in the woods on the point, but have yet had time to go there in the late evening. The luxury of being able to sneak up on one...go forth and come back with your tale.

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  4. If it were a vulture you would likely have heard more than one big flapping bird up there; I bet it was an owl flying solo. They are quite active this time of year and you may hear them calling to one another at night. Your next task will be to identify the hooting! Easier than wing-flapping.

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  5. Maybe Harry Potter is in town for Thanksgiving. Happy Thanksgiving Cowells! Have a wonderful holiday. Thank you for love, support and lifting our spirits. xoxo

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  6. I've a little award for you! Details are on my blog.

    Hugs,
    Jen

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  7. I've a little award for you! Details are on my blog.

    Hugs,
    Jen

    ReplyDelete
  8. I know your owls are a little different from our owls but I believe "Flash, flutter...pause...flap flap flap" is an owl. I listen to owls call every night before going to bed and would sooo love to be close enough to hear their wing beat. I think that means you are incredibly lucky!!

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